Discover the 12 Disciples of Jesus Christ

The 12 Disciples of Jesus Christ have been an integral part of Christianity for centuries. These 12 men were handpicked by Jesus to spread his message and build his church. Their lives and teachings have been studied and revered by Christians around the world, and their stories continue to inspire believers today. 

But the legacy of the 12 Disciples goes beyond just their individual stories. The way they were chosen, trained, and sent out has become a model for disciple making movements – a strategy for evangelism and church planting that emphasizes making disciples who make more disciples. 

Blog Post Summary

In this post, we’ll dive into the lives of the 12 Disciples, exploring their names, backgrounds, and how they were called to follow Jesus. But we’ll also take a closer look at the concept of disciple making movements and how it has influenced modern-day evangelism. 

By understanding the principles behind disciple making movements, we can gain a deeper appreciation for the work of the 12 Disciples and apply their teachings to our own lives. Whether you’re a lifelong Christian or simply curious about the history of the faith, this post will provide valuable insights and inspiration for your spiritual journey.

The way they were chosen, trained, and sent out has become a model for disciple making movements

Who were the 12 Disciples of Jesus Christ?

The 12 Disciples were a diverse group of men, each with their own unique backgrounds and experiences. 

According to the Bible, Jesus handpicked these men to be his closest followers, giving them the name “apostles,” which means “sent ones.” The 12 Disciples were: Peter, Andrew, James (son of Zebedee), John, Philip, Bartholomew, Thomas, Matthew, James (son of Alphaeus), Thaddaeus, Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot.

These men were not necessarily religious leaders or scholars, but rather ordinary people who were willing to leave behind their old lives to follow Jesus. Their stories offer valuable lessons about the importance of faith, sacrifice, and service.

The Legacy of the 12 Disciples of Jesus Christ

The 12 Disciples were also instrumental in the establishment of the early Christian church. After Jesus’ death and resurrection, they continued his work, preaching his message and spreading the word of God throughout the world. 

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Their efforts laid the foundation for Christianity as we know it today.

But the legacy of the 12 Disciples goes beyond their individual stories. The way they were chosen, trained, and sent out has become a model for disciple making movements – a strategy for evangelism and church planting that emphasizes making disciples who make more disciples. 

By following the example of the 12 Disciples and embracing the principles of disciple making movements, we can continue their work of spreading the message of Jesus Christ to all corners of the world.

Who are the 12 disciples of Jesus in order of calling

The 12 disciples of Jesus, in order of calling, are Simon Peter, Andrew, James (son of Zebedee), John, Philip, Bartholomew (also known as Nathanael), Matthew (also known as Levi), Thomas (also known as Didymus), James (son of Alphaeus), Thaddaeus (also known as Judas, son of James), Simon the Zealot, and Judas Iscariot. 

These names are mentioned in several passages in the Bible, including Matthew 10:1-4, Mark 3:13-19, Luke 6:12-16, and Acts 1:13. These verses provide insight into the specific order in which the disciples were called and named by Jesus.

It is important to note that the order in which the disciples are listed can vary slightly depending on the biblical passage being referenced. 

Each of the disciples brought their unique skills, backgrounds, and perspectives to the group, and their individual stories are an important part of the larger narrative of the gospel. 

Are the 12 Disciples and Apostles the Same?

The terms “disciple” and “apostle” are often used interchangeably, but they are not the same. 

A disciple is someone who follows and learns from a teacher, while an apostle is someone who is sent out on a mission. In the case of Jesus, the 12 disciples were his students or learners, while the apostles were those He commissioned to go out and spread His message. 

The apostles were chosen from among the disciples, but not all disciples were apostles.

The 12 Disciples were handpicked by Jesus himself, while the apostles were a select group within that larger group of disciples. Judas Iscariot was among the 12 disciples, but he ultimately betrayed Jesus and was replaced by Matthias as the 12th apostle.

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More Apostles in the New Testament 

In addition to the 12 apostles, there were other individuals who were referred to as apostles in the New Testament, such as Paul, Barnabas, and James (the brother of Jesus). These individuals were not among the original 12, but they were still recognized as apostles due to their important roles in spreading the message of Jesus Christ. 

Ultimately, the distinction between disciples and apostles is not as important as the role that each played in spreading the message of Jesus. 

Both groups were crucial in establishing the early Christian church and laying the foundation for the faith that billions of people around the world practice today. 

By studying their stories and following their example, we can continue their legacy and spread the message of Jesus Christ to all those who need to hear it.

Disciple-Making Movements Today

The model of disciples making disciple has its roots in the way Jesus trained and sent out his 12 disciples to spread the good news of the gospel. Today, a term for this idea called “disciple making movements” is a concept that has had a profound impact on modern-day evangelism and understanding of missions.

Instead of solely focusing on individual conversions, disciple making movements prioritize the training and multiplication of disciples who can then go on to make more disciples. This approach is rooted in Jesus’ own model of ministry, where he chose 12 disciples to follow him closely and trained them to continue his mission after he was gone.

The 12 disciples of Jesus were not just passive recipients of Jesus’ teachings; they were active participants in the spread of the gospel. 

They traveled with Jesus, learned from him, and later spread his message to others. They were sent out two by two to proclaim the good news and heal the sick (Mark 6:7). Jesus’ focus on making disciples, rather than simply acquiring followers, has influenced modern evangelism by encouraging a deeper emphasis on training and equipping believers to share the gospel with others.

The concept of disciple making movements has gained popularity in recent years with many missions organizations championing the approach.

The Fruit of Disciple Making Movements

By focusing on multiplying disciples, rather than just adding converts, disciple making movements have seen significant growth in places where traditional evangelistic methods have struggled. This approach has proven especially effective in reaching people groups who are resistant to traditional evangelistic methods.

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In Summary, the 12 disciples of Jesus serve as an example of the power of disciple making movements in spreading the gospel message. By following Jesus’ model of ministry, we can train and equip believers to become disciple makers, who in turn can train and equip others, leading to a multiplication of disciples and the growth of the church.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the 12 disciples of Jesus Christ played a crucial role in the establishment and spread of Christianity. 

Their unwavering faith, commitment, and dedication to spreading the gospel message continue to inspire and challenge believers today. As we reflect on the lives and teachings of the 12 disciples, we can learn valuable lessons about discipleship, evangelism, and faithfulness.

Jesus’ call to his disciples to “go and make disciples of all nations” (Matthew 28:19) remains as relevant today as it was over two thousand years ago. 

Our Personal Application

We can follow in the footsteps of the 12 disciples by sharing the good news of salvation through Jesus Christ with those around us.

Let us also remember that being a disciple of Jesus is not just about following him, but also about becoming like him. As we grow in our faith and relationship with God, we can strive to live lives that reflect his love, grace, and truth to those around us.

In summary, the 12 disciples of Jesus Christ were ordinary men who answered the call to follow Jesus and become fishers of men. 

Through their lives and teachings, we can learn important lessons about discipleship and evangelism that can guide us in our own journeys of faith.

By following Jesus’ model of ministry, we can train and equip believers to become disciple makers, who in turn can train and equip others, leading to a multiplication of disciples and the growth of the church.

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