Breaking Down Barriers: Addressing Pastors’ Objections to Disciple Making Movements

Disciple making movements (DMMs) or Church Planting Movements (CPM) are rapidly gaining popularity among churches and ministries around the world. 

These movement strategies are a powerful approach to evangelism and discipleship that involve equipping ordinary believers to share their faith and make disciples in their own relational networks. However, some pastors are hesitant to adopt these methods due to concerns or objections they have about this approach to ministry.

In this blog post, we will address some of the common objections pastors may have to disciple making movements, and provide practical responses that can help pastors overcome these objections and embrace the power of DMMs for their church.

Objection 1: DMMs are not biblical

Some pastors may object to DMMs because they do not see them as a biblical approach to evangelism and discipleship. They may argue that the Bible does not explicitly teach or model this method of ministry.

Response: While the term “disciple making movements” may not be found in the Bible, the principles and practices behind DMMs are clearly biblical. 

Jesus himself modeled the importance of making disciples and training them to do the same (Matthew 28:19-20). In the book of Acts, we see examples of the early church multiplying and expanding rapidly through the efforts of ordinary believers sharing their faith and making disciples in their own communities (Acts 2:41-47, Acts 6:7). 

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DMMs simply provide a structured approach to following these biblical principles, enabling churches to more effectively reach their communities with the gospel.

Objection 2: DMMs are too radical or extreme

Some pastors may object to DMMs because they see them as too radical or extreme for their church. They may be concerned that this approach will alienate members of their congregation or drive away potential visitors.

Response: While DMMs do require a level of commitment and sacrifice, they are not intended to be extreme or radical in a negative sense. 

Rather, they are a natural outworking of the Great Commission that Jesus gave to all believers (Matthew 28:19-20). Additionally, DMMs can be adapted to fit the unique needs and culture of each church. For example, a church in a rural area may use DMMs to reach out to farmers and agricultural workers, while a church in an urban setting may focus on reaching out to people in apartment complexes or public transit stations. 

The key is to start small and work within the existing relationships and networks of the church.

Objection 3: DMMs are too difficult or time-consuming

Some pastors may object to disciple making movements because they believe that this approach to ministry requires too much time and effort. They may be concerned that implementing DMMs will take away from other important ministry activities or put too much burden on the pastor and church leadership.

Response: While DMMs do require a certain amount of investment and effort, they are not necessarily more time-consuming or difficult than other approaches to ministry. 

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In fact, DMMs can be a more efficient and effective way of reaching people with the gospel. 

By empowering ordinary believers to share their faith and make disciples in their own relational networks, DMMs can exponentially increase the reach and impact of the church without necessarily requiring more time or resources from the pastor or church leadership.

Conclusion

Disciple making movements are a powerful approach to evangelism and discipleship that can help churches reach their communities with the gospel in a more effective and efficient way. 

While some pastors may have objections or concerns about DMMs, these objections can be overcome by focusing on the biblical principles and practices behind this approach, adapting DMMs to fit the unique needs and culture of each church, and recognizing the potential impact and benefits of implementing DMMs in their church. 

With these considerations in mind, pastors can effectively train their church.

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